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Vanessa Wauchope begins abdominal exercises in Leah Keller's class in San Francisco, Calif. Keller teaches an exercise, called "drawing in," to help strengthen abdominal muscles that tend to spread apart a bit during pregnancy. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Talia Herman for NPR

This sequence of images shows the development of embryos formed after eggs were injected with both CRISPR, a gene-editing tool, and sperm from a donor with a genetic mutation known to cause cardiomyopathy. OHSU hide caption

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OHSU

Exclusive: Inside The Lab Where Scientists Are Editing DNA In Human Embryos

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Single malt Scotch whisky, produced at the Auchentoshan distillery near Glasgow, Scotland, could benefit from a little water, a new paper suggests. Andy Buchanan /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Buchanan /AFP/Getty Images
Matt Twombly for NPR

Probiotic Bacteria Could Protect Newborns From Deadly Infection

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Binge-drinking sounds like an all-night bender, but here's a reality check: Many social drinkers may "binge" without knowing it. Women who drink four or more drinks on an occasion are binge-drinking. Ann Boyajian/Getty Images/Illustration Works hide caption

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Ann Boyajian/Getty Images/Illustration Works

With Heavy Drinking On The Rise, How Much Is Too Much?

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Arthritis is a joint disease that can cause cartilage destruction and erosion of the bone, as well as tendon inflammation and rupture. Affected areas are highlighted in red in this enhanced X-ray. Philippe Sellem/Paul Demri/ Voisin/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Sellem/Paul Demri/ Voisin/Science Source

6,000-Year-Old Knee Joints Suggest Osteoarthritis Isn't Just Wear And Tear

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Nisian Hughes/Getty Images

New Study Highlights Strong Link Between Basic Research And Inventions

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Researchers: Hackers Could Encode Human DNA With Malicious Software

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A recent study shows a link between high discharge rates for live patients and hospice profit margins. Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Nearly 1 In 5 Hospice Patients Discharged While Still Alive

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Andrew Ladd and Fumiko Chino at their wedding in 2006, after his cancer diagnosis. Ladd died the following year, leaving behind hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical debt. Courtesy of Dr. Fumiko Chino hide caption

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Courtesy of Dr. Fumiko Chino

Widowed Early, A Cancer Doctor Writes About The Harm Of Medical Debt

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Valeant Pharmaceuticals, based in Bridgewater Township, N.J., bought two specialty heart drugs used in emergency treatment from Marathon Pharmaceuticals in 2015, and then dramatically increased each drug's price. Ron Antonelli/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Antonelli/Bloomberg via Getty Images