Scientists Come Close To Finding True Magnetic Monopole

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What's The Problem With Feeling On Top Of The World?

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Magellanic penguins strut their stuff on the rocky shoreline of Argentina's Punta Tombo, home to the largest colony of the birds in the world. Craig Lovell/Corbis hide caption

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Changing Climate In Argentina Is Killing Penguin Chicks

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Charles, Prince of Wales, smells before tasting some ice cream during a visit to Gloucestershire. Maybe he was sniffing for fat? Barry Batchelor/Getty Images hide caption

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Some men take testosterone hoping to boost energy and libido, or to build strength. But at what risk? iStockphoto hide caption

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Playing outside can help kids — and their parents — maintain a healthy weight. iStockphoto hide caption

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Adult Obesity May Have Origins Way Back In Kindergarten

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Love your hair. Artists' depictions of a Neanderthal man and woman at the Neanderthal Museum in Mettmann, Germany. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

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Neanderthal Genes Live On In Our Hair And Skin

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A new study on lactose tolerance among early farmers in Spain challenges a leading theory that humans developed an appetite for milk to avoid calcium deficiency. iStock hide caption

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A mouse embryo grows from stem cells made by stressing blood cells with acid. The blood cells are tagged with a protein that creates green light. Courtesy of Haruko Obokata hide caption

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A Little Acid Turns Mouse Blood Into Brain, Heart And Stem Cells

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Graduate student Jennifer Klunk of McMaster University examines a tooth used to decode the genome of the ancient plague. Courtesy of McMaster University hide caption

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Ancient Plague's DNA Revived From A 1,500-Year-Old Tooth

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Researchers Examine Gap Between Rich And Poor

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Clinical specialist Catey Funaiock took notes while observing a 5-year-old boy at the Marcus Autism Center, part of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, in September. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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The eastern Grand Canyon was about half-carved (to the level of the red cliffs above the hiker) from 15 million to 25 million years ago, an analysis published Sunday suggests. But the inner gorge was likely scooped out by the Colorado River in just the past 6 million years. Laura Crossey/University of New Mexico hide caption

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Grand Canyon May Be Older (And Younger) Than You Think

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Ross' campsite on the West Antarctic ice sheet. For weeks, researchers eat, sleep and analyze data in these tents. Neil Ross/Newcastle University hide caption

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Antarctic Discovery: A Massive Valley Under The Ice

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Computer networks and GPS systems are only possible because of the precision timekeeping of atomic clocks like the one above, says clockmaker and physicist Jun Ye. Ye Group and Baxley/JILA hide caption

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Tickety-Tock! An Even More Accurate Atomic Clock

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