An iceberg that likely calved from Jakobshavn Isbrae, the fastest glacier in western Greenland. Ian Joughin/Science/AAAS hide caption

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Greenland, Antarctic Ice Is Melting Faster

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Can You Tell Emotion From Faces Alone? A new study suggests that when people evaluated just facial expressions — without cues from the rest of the body — they couldn't tell if the face was showing a positive or negative emotion. Enlarge this photo to see the answers. Hillel Aviezer/The Hebrew University of Jerusalem hide caption

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Victory Or Defeat? Emotions Aren't All In The Face

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Researchers say they have identified traces of ice in craters on Mercury, seen here in this Oct. 8, 2008, image from the Messenger spacecraft. NASA hide caption

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Space Probe Finds Ice In Mercury's Craters

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Spinach has lots of opportunities to pick up E. coli and other bugs during harvest and growing. Here, a Mexican migrant worker cuts organic spinach during the fall harvest at Grant Family Farms in Wellington, Co. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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A worker inspects a huge target chamber at the National Ignition Facility in California, in 2001, where beams from 192 lasers are aimed at a pellet of fusion fuel in the hopes of creating nuclear fusion. Joe McNally/Getty Images hide caption

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A Short Fuse For Fusion As Ignition Misses Deadline

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Does This Guy Matter? Conductor Leonard Bernstein during rehearsal with the Cincinnati Symphony at Carnegie Hall in 1977. James Garrett/New York Daily News via Getty Images hide caption

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Do Orchestras Really Need Conductors?

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Apes, Humans Share A Happiness Dip Mid-Life

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William Beal, standing at center, started a long-term study on seed germination in 1879. He buried 20 bottles with seeds in them for later researchers to unearth and plant. Michigan State University hide caption

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Experiments That Keep Going And Going And Going

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Ig Nobel Prizes Celebrate Somewhat Suspect Science

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Pathologist Thomas Harvey took dozens of photos of Einstein's brain. This one shows that Einstein's prefrontal cortex (associated with higher cognition and memory) is unusually convoluted. On the right side of the brain there are four large ridges, where most people have only three. Brain(2012)/National Museum of Health and Medicine hide caption

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A forest near Trieste, Italy, is largely dead owing to drought stress during the summer of 2012. Andrea Nardini/Nature hide caption

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An Arbor Embolism? Why Trees Die In Drought

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Can Shellfish Adapt to More Acidic Water?

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Study Questions Mammograms 'Overdiagnosis'

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