A 1992 copy of the world's first Web page. British physicist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web in 1989. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Researchers Debate Effectiveness Of Snow Helmets
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Why We Miss Creative Ideas That Are Right Under Our Noses
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Online, Researcher Says, Teens Do What They've Always Done
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The Hadean zircons --€ the” oldest bits of Earth yet found --€” were discovered near here, on a sheep ranch in Jack Hills, Western Australia. Courtesy of University of Wisconsin hide caption

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At 4.4 Billion Years Old, Oz Crystals Confirmed As World's Oldest
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Are More Eccentric Artists Perceived As Better Artists?
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New research finds a close connection between the flu that devastated the horse population in North America in the 1870s and the avian flu of that period. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Video games with lots of action might be useful for helping people with dyslexia train the brain's attention system. iStockphoto hide caption

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Climbing robots, modeled after termites, can be programmed to work together to build tailor-made structures. [Image courtesy of Eliza Grinnell, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences hide caption

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Robot Construction Workers Take Their Cues From Termites
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Until recently, finding characteristic stone and bone tools was the only way to trace the fate of the Clovis people, whose culture appeared in North America about 13,000 years ago. Sarah L. Anzick/Nature hide caption

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Ancient DNA Ties Native Americans From Two Continents To Clovis
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The National Ignition Facility's 192 laser beams focus onto a tiny target. LLNL hide caption

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Scientists Say Their Giant Laser Has Produced Nuclear Fusion
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A customer shops for milk at a Safeway in Livermore, Calif. Although it may seem counterintuitive, there's growing evidence that full-fat dairy is linked to reduced body weight. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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The Full-Fat Paradox: Whole Milk May Keep Us Lean
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