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This computer-enhanced barium contrast X-ray shows colon cancer in red. Researchers have been trying to figure out what looks to be a decade-long rise in colon cancer among people younger than 50. Scott Camazine/Science Source hide caption

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Scott Camazine/Science Source

SpaceX says its Falcon Heavy rocket, shown here in an artist's rendering, will be used in the mission to the moon. SpaceX hide caption

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SpaceX

SpaceX Announces Plans To Send Two Customers To The Moon

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From field to bakery, a loaf of bread packs a measurable environmental punch. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

What's The Environmental Footprint Of A Loaf Of Bread? Now We Know

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A computer analysis found that people with the same name were more likely to share similar expressions around their eyes and mouths, areas of the face that are easier to adjust. Courtesy of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology hide caption

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Courtesy of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

A Medicine That Blunts The Buzz Of Alcohol Can Help Drinkers Cut Back

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Explaining The Sizzling Sound Of Meteors

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Nancy Roach at a conference in 2016. She's long worked as a patient's advocate and recently teamed up with scientists to help improve the design of studies, as well as to improve clinical care. Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer hide caption

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Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer

Advice From Patients On A Study's Design Makes For Better Science

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Courtesy of TEDxSaltLakeCity

Kevin Jones: Can Embracing Uncertainty Lead To Better Medicine?

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Ryan Lash/TED

Naomi Oreskes: Why Should We Believe In Science?

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Bumblebees have 100,000 times fewer neurons than humans do, but they can learn new skills quickly when there's a sweet reward at the end. Michael Durham/Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Durham/Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Could A Bumblebee Learn To Play Fetch? Probably

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Andie Vaught grasps a stress toy in the shape of a truck as she prepares to have blood drawn as part of a clinical trial for a Zika vaccine at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., in November 2016. Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Scientists rallied for evidence-based public policy outside the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting in San Francisco in December. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Should Scientists March? U.S. Researchers Still Debating Pros And Cons

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Anemic patients did not know about their condition during a testosterone trial. Renphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Renphoto/Getty Images

Researchers Failed To Tell Testosterone Trial Patients They Were Anemic

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Does Studying Economics Make You Selfish?

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