A Tokyo sushi restaurant displays blocks of fat meat tuna cut out from a 269kg bluefin tuna. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nuclear Tuna Is Hot News, But Not Because It's Going To Make You Sick
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Drawn To Sweets Or Fats? Blame Your Genes
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Clogged Ketchup No More With MIT's 'LiquiGlide'
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Rerouting Working Nerves To Restore Hand Function
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Stroke Victims Think, Robotic Arm Acts
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Plastic surgeon Amy Pare says it's important for doctors to know what kind of substances patients she's treating might have been exposed to. Susan Philips/WHYY hide caption

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Pennsylvania Doctors Worry Over Fracking 'Gag Rule'
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Researcher Hans Roy opens a core sample taken from the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. A core sample like this one contained bacteria that settled on the seafloor 86 million years ago. Bo Barker Jorgensen/Science/AAAS hide caption

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Ancient Deep-Sea Bacteria Are In No Hurry To Eat
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Brain Implant Lets Quadriplegics Move Robotic Limbs
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Can We Open-Source Hardware?
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A working gas well head is fenced in just opposite of a home in Dish, Texas. Dish is about 30 miles north of Fort Worth. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Town's Effort To Link Fracking And Illness Falls Short
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William Reigle has fibrosis, a disease that may be aggravated by nearby fracking. He's one of more than 2 million Pennsylvanians who get their health care from Geisinger Health System. The system wants to use its extensive database of patient records to study the health impact of natural gas production. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Medical Records Could Yield Answers On Fracking
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Fact Checking Data On The Boomerang Generation
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The hit TV show Modern Family features a gay couple trying to adopt their second child. ABC via Getty Images hide caption

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How TV Brought Gay People Into Our Homes
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