Team Of Researchers Dig Up New Compound In An Unlikely Spot: Our Noses

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Once scientists grew these Staphylococcus lugdunensis bacteria in a lab dish, they were able to isolate a compound that's lethal to another strain commonly found in the nose that can make us sick — Staphylococcus aureus. Mostly Harmless/Flickr hide caption

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Michigan State University researchers Sunpreet Arora (left), Anil Jain (center) and Kai Cao (right) tried 3-D printed fingertips and 2-D fingerprint replicas on conductive paper to unlock a murder victim's phone, similar to one in the photo. Derrick Turner/Michigan State University hide caption

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Though Jupiter's red spot looks small in this photo, it's actually about 10,000 miles wide — bigger than Earth's diameter. Space Telescope Science Institute/NASA hide caption

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How Jupiter's Red Spot Makes Things High Above It Hot, Hot, Hot

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Why The First Name On The Ballot Often Wins

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Parkinson's disease, smoking, certain head injuries and even normal aging can influence our sense of smell. But certain patterns of loss in the ability to identify odors seem pronounced in Alzheimer's, researchers say. CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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A Sniff Test For Alzheimer's Checks For The Ability To Identify Odors

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Four sheep cloned from the same genetic material as Dolly roam the paddocks in Nottingham, England. The University of Nottingham hide caption

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'Sister Clones' Of Dolly The Sheep Are Alive And Kicking

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The Solar-powered Solar Impulse 2 aircraft prepares to take off from the Cairo International Airport in the Egyptian capital on Sunday as it heads to Abu Dhabi on the final leg of its world tour. Khaled Desouki /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yao honey hunter Orlando Yassene holds a male greater honeyguide temporarily captured for research in the Niassa National Reserve, Mozambique. The birds will flutter in front of people, tweet and fly from tree to tree to guide hunters to bees' nests that are hidden inside the trunks of hollow trees. This teamwork could date back thousands or even a million years. Claire Spottiswoode hide caption

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How Wild Birds Team Up With Humans To Guide Them To Honey

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The physical therapy workouts a rehabilitation facility offers can be a crucial part of healing, doctors say. But a government study finds preventable harm — including bedsores and medication errors — occurring in some of those facilities, too. Andersen Ross/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Grains, beads and bangles unearthed from dig sites in Banda, Ghana, tell of a time when droughts did not bring famine. (Above) Archaeologists Amanda Logan and Osei Kofi dig into the floor of a house from the 1500s. Courtesy of Ann Stahl/Northwestern University hide caption

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Peter Lee, executive director of Covered California, the state's health insurance exchange, said the projected rate increases for 2017 are linked to increases in the cost of health care in the state. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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