Explaining The Sizzling Sound Of Meteors

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Nancy Roach at a conference in 2016. She's long worked as a patient's advocate and recently teamed up with scientists to help improve the design of studies, as well as to improve clinical care. Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer hide caption

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Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer

Advice From Patients On A Study's Design Makes For Better Science

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Kevin Jones: Can Embracing Uncertainty Lead To Better Medicine?

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Naomi Oreskes: Why Should We Believe In Science?

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Bumblebees have 100,000 times fewer neurons than humans do, but they can learn new skills quickly when there's a sweet reward at the end. Michael Durham/Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Durham/Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Could A Bumblebee Learn To Play Fetch? Probably

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Andie Vaught grasps a stress toy in the shape of a truck as she prepares to have blood drawn as part of a clinical trial for a Zika vaccine at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., in November 2016. Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists rallied for evidence-based public policy outside the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting in San Francisco in December. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Should Scientists March? U.S. Researchers Still Debating Pros And Cons

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Anemic patients did not know about their condition during a testosterone trial. Renphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Renphoto/Getty Images

Researchers Failed To Tell Testosterone Trial Patients They Were Anemic

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Does Studying Economics Make You Selfish?

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The program BAM (Becoming a Man) works with teenagers and uses cognitive behavior therapy to reduce violence in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Can Poetry Keep You Young? Science Is Still Out, But The Heart Says Yes

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Brown recluse spiders are indeed reclusive, so bites are more apt to happen in places like closets or attics. Rosa Pineda/Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History/Flickr hide caption

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Rosa Pineda/Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History/Flickr

Beekeepers Glen Andresen and Tim Wessels are trying to breed a honey bee that is more resilient to colder climates. Kathryn Boyd-Batstone/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kathryn Boyd-Batstone/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Researchers Examine Race Factor In Car Crashes Involving Pedestrians

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