The Idea Factory: How Bell Labs Created The Future

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Keith Ballard, right, of the Vancouver Canucks is tripped by Colin Fraser of the Los Angeles Kings for a penalty during game in Los Angeles on April 18. Researchers studying hockey penalties found that teams wearing black jerseys were far more likely to draw penalties than teams wearing other colored or white jerseys. Harry How/Getty Images hide caption

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Power (Dis)Play? Teams In Black Draw More Penalties

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Local officials burn chicken coops in anticipation of a resurgence in bird flu in Jakarta, Indonesia, in January. Concerns about potential misuse of research into genes that control the contagiousness of flu have stymied publication. Tatan Syuflana/AP hide caption

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In this undated picture, Mount Everest, the world's tallest mountain at 29,029 feet, stands behind the Khumbu Glacier, one of the longest glaciers in the world. Nepal has more than 2,300 glacial lakes, and experts say at least 20 are in danger of bursting. Subel Bhandari/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Melt Or Grow? Fate Of Himalayan Glaciers Unknown

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Exploring The Deepest, Darkest Spots On Earth

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Justin Knapp Makes History On Wikipedia

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Death Penalty Research Flawed, Expert Panel Says

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Bo Van Pelt celebrates his hole-in-one during the final round of the Masters on April 8. New research suggests that golfers may be able to improve their games by believing the hole they're aiming for is larger than it really is. Andrew Redington/Getty Images hide caption

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Can You Think Your Way To That Hole-In-One?

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The Race To Create The Best Antiviral Drugs

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Survey participants in a UCLA study were asked to look at pictures of a hand holding different items and guess how tall, how big and how muscular the person connected to that hand actually was. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bigger, Taller, Stronger: Guns Change What You See

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Marc Abrahams Makes Science Improbably Funny

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Researchers studied baboons, including this one, and found that with training, they could distinguish real four-letter English words from four letters that weren't a word. Joel Fagot/Science/AAAS hide caption

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The (Monkey) Business Of Recognizing Words

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Taxes Lead To Stress Which Leads To Fatal Wrecks

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An electron microscope view of the bird flu virus. PR Newswire hide caption

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Bird Flu Studies Mired In Export Control Law Limbo

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An artist's impression of a group of Yutyrannus. The 30-foot-long dinosaurs were covered with downy feathers — likely to keep the animals warm. Dr. Brian Choo/Nature hide caption

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A 'Warm And Fuzzy' Dino? (Yes, But Mind The Teeth)

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