Researchers at New York University Hospital worry the mice they use to study human disease may have perished in the flooding caused by Superstorm Sandy. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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These computer models from Oct. 26 of then-Hurricane Sandy show different predictions for the storm's path. NOAA hide caption

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NOAA

High-Def Storm Models Yielded Accurate Predictions

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The secret to making something low-fat taste good and keep us fuller longer may be in its thickness. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Is Climate Change Responsible For Sandy?

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Taxis sit in a flooded lot in Hoboken, N.J., after Hurricane Sandy caused massive flooding across much of the Atlantic Seaboard. Michael Bocchieri/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Bocchieri/Getty Images

Sandy Raises Questions About Climate And The Future

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Is there an angel or a devil behind the mask? Scientists say it may not matter in terms of anonymous behavior. Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images

An ambulance is stuck in over a foot of snow off of Highway 33 West, near Belington, W.Va. on Oct. 30. Superstorm Sandy buried parts of West Virginia under more than a foot of snow. Robert Ray/AP hide caption

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Robert Ray/AP

As Coasts Flood, Inland Areas See Blizzards

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New York, New Jersey Hit Hard By Superstorm Sandy

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Cray employees put the finishing touches on Titan at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. The supercomputer may be the world's fastest. It's designed to do 20 petaflops — or 20,000 trillion calculations — each second. It consumes enough electricity to power a small city of 9,000 people. Courtesy of Nvidia hide caption

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Courtesy of Nvidia

Why Is This Supercomputer So Superfast?

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