A test field of sorghum outside Manhattan, Kan., planted by Kansas State University. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Heat, Drought Draw Farmers Back To Sorghum, The 'Camel Of Crops'

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Workers in protective suits hold dummy munition during a demonstration at a chemical weapons disposal facility in Muenster, Germany, on Wednesday. Philipp Guelland/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Burn, Bury Or Scorch? Why Destroying Syria's Chemical Weapons Is Hard

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Kids might be more satisfied if they get one good treat instead of one good treat and one lesser treat. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Why Are Kids Who Get Less Candy Happier On Halloween?

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The Rockaway section of Queens, in New York City, was hit hard by Superstorm Sandy. Many people in the neighborhood, shown here on October 30, 2012, lost power. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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In Sandy's Wake, Flood Zones And Insurance Rates Re-Examined

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The amount of water to make the bottle could be up to six or seven times what's inside the bottle, according to the Water Footprint Network. Steven Depolo/Flickr hide caption

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Budget cutbacks threaten a planned upgrade of the massive Titan supercomputer, seen here, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Charles Brooks/Oak Ridge National Laboratory hide caption

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Science On Shaky Ground As Automatic Budget Cutbacks Drag On

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How To See Forever On Your Dirty Car

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Illustration by Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Eeek, Snake! Your Brain Has A Special Corner Just For Them

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Eva Hu-Stiles virtually interacts with her grandmother. iPad assist by Elise Hu-Stiles. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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What You Need To Know About Babies, Toddlers And Screen Time

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Cars lie smashed by the collapsed Interstate 5 connector a few hours after the Northridge earthquake on Jan. 17, 1994, in California. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Predicting Quakes Still Shaky, But Being Prepared Is Crucial

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The Long Beach High School marching band prepares to march down the Long Beach boardwalk during a ribbon-cutting ceremony Friday. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Is Rebuilding Storm-Struck Coastlines Worth The Cost?

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