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This 1933 photo made available by the U.S. Geological Survey shows the ruins of St. Anthony's Church in Long Beach, Calif., after an earthquake struck on March 10, 1933. T.J. Maher/AP hide caption

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T.J. Maher/AP

The Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft as it lands with NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin and astronaut Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency on Sunday. Bill Ingalls/NASA hide caption

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Bill Ingalls/NASA

Asteroids regularly pass by Earth, as depicted here. A new NASA system called Scout aims to identify the ones that will come closest to the planet. P. Carril/ESA hide caption

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P. Carril/ESA

NASA's New 'Intruder Alert' System Spots An Incoming Asteroid

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This chick will live. It's female. Jessica Harms/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Harms/Getty Images

Technology May Rescue Male Baby Chicks From The Grinder

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Boats sit on the beach at Bahia Almirantazgo in Antarctica. An agreement was reached on Friday to create the world's largest marine protected area in the ocean next to the frozen continent. Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

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Natacha Pisarenko/AP

A new study says campaign ads in battleground states also impact contributions. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Social Science Research Behind Political Campaign Ads

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A lynx leaves his cage during a release into the wild, in July in Kaiserlautern, western Germany. Jean-Christophe Verhaegen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jean-Christophe Verhaegen/AFP/Getty Images

Giant sequoias in the Sierra Nevada range can grow to be 250 feet tall — or more. John Buie/Flickr hide caption

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John Buie/Flickr

How Is A 1,600-Year-Old Tree Weathering California's Drought?

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This rock was found on a British beach. Some scientists believe it could contain fossilized brain tissue. Jamie Hiscocks/University of Cambridge hide caption

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Jamie Hiscocks/University of Cambridge

Researchers Say They've Found A Bit Of Fossilized Dinosaur Brain

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Placebos are commonly thought of as fake treatments that people think are real. But they may be helpful even if you know they're fake. Tim Robberts/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Robberts/Getty Images
LA Johnson/NPR

National Science Test Scores Are Out, But What Do They Really Tell Us?

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Laura Kemp, a technician at The Land Institute, hand harvests an experimental crop of Kernza in Kansas. Scientists think that this perennial crop could help fight climate change by trapping more carbon in the soil. Courtesy of The Land Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of The Land Institute