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A baby born with microcephaly in Brazil is examined by a neurologist. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

Zika Is Linked To Microcephaly, Health Agencies Confirm

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A Madison Water Utility Crew works to dig up and replace a broken water shutoff box in preparation for a larger pipe-lining project. Madison started using copper instead of lead pipes in the late 1920s. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Avoiding A Future Crisis, Madison Removed Lead Water Pipes 15 Years Ago

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FDA Approves Experimental Zika Screening For Blood Donations

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The Secret, Social Lives Of Mountain Lions

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A Bolivian farmer harvests organic quinoa in his fields in Puerto Perez, Bolivia. Some researchers are working with quinoa farmers in Bolivia and Peru to try to develop internal markets for threatened varieties — for example, in hospital and school food programs. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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Juan Karita/AP

Industrial Science Hunts For Nursing Home Fraud In New Mexico Case

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A map by cartographer Andy Woodruff shows the coastlines around the world from which you could "see" Australia and Oceania, if you could follow your gaze around the Earth's curvature. Courtesy of Andy Woodruff hide caption

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Courtesy of Andy Woodruff

Tundra Issue: How To Keep Oil Workers From Crossing Paths With Bears

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Dr. Dorry Segev (right), of Johns Hopkins Medicine, led the team of doctors that transplanted an HIV-positive liver and kidney into two different HIV-positive patients this month. Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

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Johns Hopkins Medicine

New Source Of Transplant Organs For Patients With HIV: Others With HIV

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Fatty plaque (shown here in yellow) blocks about 60 percent of this coronary artery's width. The increasing thickness of artery walls is just one factor that can increase vulnerability to a heart attack or stroke. Prof. P.M. Motta/G. Macchiarelli, S.A. Nottola/Science Source hide caption

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Prof. P.M. Motta/G. Macchiarelli, S.A. Nottola/Science Source

Possible Heart Benefits Of Taking Estrogen Get Another Look

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California Officials Release New Rainfall Figures After El Nino

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Employees work on the construction of an "ice wall" last month at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant. March 11 marked the fifth anniversary of the magnitude-9.0 earthquake and tsunami that caused meltdowns at Fukushima. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

An oil field truck is used to make a transfer at oil-storage tanks in Williston, N.D., in 2014. It was atop tanks like these that oil worker Dustin Bergsing, 21, was found dead. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Mysterious Death Reveals Risk In Federal Oil Field Rules

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The modern broiler, or meat chicken, grows incredibly fast. But some critics say the bird — and the flavor of its meat — may suffer as a result. Whole Foods wants all of its suppliers to shift to slower-growing chicken breeds, like this one, seen at Arkansas-based Crystal Lake Farms. Courtesy of Crystal Lake Farms hide caption

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Courtesy of Crystal Lake Farms

Why Whole Foods Wants A Slower-Growing Chicken

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