The four cuts at the top of this skull "are clear chops to the forehead," says Smithsonian forensic anthropologist Douglas Owsley. Based on forensic evidence, researchers think the blows were made after the person died. Donald E. Hurlbert/Smithsonian hide caption

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Bones Tell Tale Of Desperation Among The Starving At Jamestown

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Bates experienced migraines as a child. She made this painting to depict how they felt to her. Courtesy of Emily Bates hide caption

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A Sleep Gene Has A Surprising Role In Migraines

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A still from A Boy and His Atom. IBM hide caption

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Bob Mondello's Review

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Doctors at a hospital in Aleppo, Syria, treat a boy injured in what the government said was a chemical weapons attack on March 19. Syria's government and rebels accused each other of firing a rocket loaded with chemical agents outside of Aleppo. George Ourfalian/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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How Doctors Would Know If Syrians Were Hit With Nerve Gas

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Criminologist Believes Violent Behavior Is Biological

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The research of British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) played a pivotal role in developing the theory of natural selection. But over time, Charles Darwin became almost universally thought of as the father of evolution. Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis hide caption

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He Helped Discover Evolution, And Then Became Extinct

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A mammoth spinning vortex is seen on Saturn, in this "false-color" photograph released by NASA Monday. The image was captured by the Cassini spacecraft. A related image, presenting what a human eye would see, is farther down this page. NASA hide caption

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Beekeepers demonstrate at the EU headquarters in Brussels Monday, as lawmakers vote on whether to ban pesticides blamed for killing bees. Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Big Sibling's Big Influence: Some Behaviors Run In The Family

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