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Attacking McCain On One Of His Strengths

Attacking McCain On One Of His Strengths

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Seeking to turn McCain's slogan ("Country First") and military credentials against him, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees launched a new ad accusing McCain of putting his party before veterans care. It's either a tough sell or an audacious move, considering one of McCain's top selling points is his war hero status.

The ad features a series of vets who deliver a series of sharp jabs:

  • "John McCain sided with George Bush, and opposed the new GI bill."
  • "When John Mccain has to chose between his party, and better care for veterans, he sides with his party.
  • "John McCain hasn't voted for us for years — I can't vote for him in November."

The ad is up in New Mexico. Factcheck.org says McCain did support bills to increase health and education benefits for veterans, though not by as much as what Democrats had proposed.