The huge sun shield of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope must be carefully folded to fit into a space about the size of a school bus before takeoff. Chris Gunn/NASA hide caption

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Chris Gunn/NASA

Some Assembly Required: New Space Telescope Will Take Shape After Launch

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NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough shows a pouch of turkey he will be preparing for his crew in celebration of the Thanksgiving holiday, aboard the International Space Station. AP hide caption

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AP

A computer illustration of a large asteroid colliding with Earth. (Size may not be to scale.) Such an impact is believed to have led to the death of the dinosaurs some 66 million years ago. Mark Garlick /Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM hide caption

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Mark Garlick /Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM

An artist's depiction of the new GOES-R satellite. Lockheed Martin/Flickr hide caption

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Lockheed Martin/Flickr

New Satellite Provides Weather Forecasts For The Final Frontier

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Peggy Whitson Is About To Become The Oldest Woman Ever In Space

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The world's largest radio telescope is nestled among the jagged, green mountains of southwest China's Guizhou Province. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

In Southwest China, A 'Very Large Eyeball' Peers Into Deep Space

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Skygazers Await The First Supermoon Since 1948

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With the Nov. 13 supermoon rising in the background, a man looks out from a balcony in Madrid. At its closest pass to Earth, the full moon can look up to 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter, NASA says. Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images

Closest Supermoon Since 1948 Arrives Monday: Tips On Seeing And Photographing It

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For First Time Since 1948, Supermoon Rises On Monday

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The Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft as it lands with NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin and astronaut Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency on Sunday. Bill Ingalls/NASA hide caption

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Bill Ingalls/NASA

Asteroids regularly pass by Earth, as depicted here. A new NASA system called Scout aims to identify the ones that will come closest to the planet. P. Carril/ESA hide caption

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P. Carril/ESA

NASA's New 'Intruder Alert' System Spots An Incoming Asteroid

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Corot 7b L. Calçada/ESO hide caption

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L. Calçada/ESO

Out Of This World: How Artists Imagine Planets Yet Unseen

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