Space NPR coverage of space exploration, space shuttle missions, news from NASA, private space exploration, satellite technology, and new discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics.

This false-color image of Enceladus shows so-called "tiger stripes" across the moon's icy surface. Researchers believe the stripes are caused by an ocean beneath the ice. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute hide caption

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NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

NASA Spacecraft To Skim Past Saturn's Icy Moon

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Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Peabody Awards

Not My Job: We Quiz Cosmos Expert Neil deGrasse Tyson On Cosmetology

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The Year In Space: U.S., Russian Spacefarers On The International Station

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The "Super-Kamiokande" neutrino detector operated by the University of Tokyo's Institute for Cosmic Ray Research helped scientist Takaaki Kajita win a share of the Nobel Prize in Physics, along with Canadian Arthur B. McDonald. Kyodo /Landov hide caption

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Kyodo /Landov

Matt Damon portrays an astronaut who relies on science to survive on a hostile planet. Giles Keyte/EPKTV hide caption

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Giles Keyte/EPKTV

How 'The Martian' Became A Science Love Story

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For several years, a satellite orbiting Mars has seen streaks flowing from Martian mountains during warm periods on the surface. Scientists have now confirmed that water is involved. NASA/JPL/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Scientists Confirm There's Water In The Dark Streaks On Mars

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A 'Super Bowl' Of The Sky: Sunday's Supermoon Eclipse

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