Space NPR coverage of space exploration, space shuttle missions, news from NASA, private space exploration, satellite technology, and new discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics.

The U.K. coastguard and local boatmen recovered a piece of metal from the sea off the Isles of Scilly in Britain. The debris is likely from the U.S. rocket SpaceX Falcon 9, which blew up after takeoff in June. Handout/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Handout/Reuters/Landov

An illustration shows what a helicopter drone would look like on the surface of Mars. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Someday A Helicopter Drone May Fly Over Mars And Help A Rover

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Blue Origin Announces Successful Launch, Landing Of Rocket

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Astronaut Kjell Lindgren Plays Bagpipes In Space

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The new object is one of many dwarf planets orbiting at the edge of the solar system. This artist's conception shows the previous record-holder for distance, a dwarf planet called Eris. ESO/L. Calçada hide caption

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ESO/L. Calçada

Astronomers Spot Most Distant Object So Far In The Solar System

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The grooves on Mars' moon Phobos could be produced by tidal forces – the mutual gravitational pull of the planet and the moon, says NASA. The theory is the latest explanation for grooves that were once thought to result from the massive impact that caused the Stickney crater (lower right). NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

Extravehicular crewmember 2 (EV2) Terry Virts is reflected in the helmet visor of EV1 Barry Wilmore during Extravehicular Activity 29 (EVA 29). Earth is in the background. Courtesy of NASA hide caption

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Courtesy of NASA

What It's Really Like To 'Walk' In Space

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Solar storms from the sun send charged particles streaming towards Mars. Research now shows those particles are stripping away the atmosphere. NASA/GSFC hide caption

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NASA/GSFC

Researchers Reveal How Climate Change Killed Mars

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This false-color image of Enceladus shows so-called "tiger stripes" across the moon's icy surface. Researchers believe the stripes are caused by an ocean beneath the ice. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute hide caption

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NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

NASA Spacecraft To Skim Past Saturn's Icy Moon

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Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Peabody Awards

Not My Job: We Quiz Cosmos Expert Neil deGrasse Tyson On Cosmetology

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