This diagram for the outer solar system shows the orbits of Sedna (in orange) and 2012 VP113 (in red). The sun and terrestrial planets are at the center, surrounded by the orbits (in purple) of the four giant planets — Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. The Kuiper belt, which includes Pluto, is shown by the dotted light blue region. Scott S. Sheppard/Carnegie Institution for Science hide caption

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From left: U.S. astronaut Steve Swanson, and Russian cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev prior to the launch of their Soyuz-FG rocket Wednesday at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Dmitry Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Neil deGrasse Tyson is hosting Cosmos, the science documentary series made popular by Carl Sagan. Tyson is Sagan's successor as America's most famous scientist. Richard Shotwell/Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP hide caption

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It's OK, kids. Even Albert Einstein sometimes made math mistakes. Harris & Ewing/Library of Congress hide caption

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Early days: NASA's International Sun-Earth Explorer C (also known as ISEE-3 and ICE) was undergoing testing and evaluation inside the Goddard Space Flight Center's dynamic test chamber when this photo was snapped in 1976. NASA hide caption

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This image released Monday by Harvard-led researchers represents the gravitational waves in the Cosmic Microwave Background in the microsecond after the Big Bang. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics hide caption

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For helping to find asteroids, NASA has set up a contest with cash awards. In 2012, the agency said that "more potentially hazardous asteroids, or PHAs, are closely aligned with the plane of our solar system than previous models suggested." NASA hide caption

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Julian Treasure speaking at TED. James Duncan Davidson/TED hide caption

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The Z machine is located in Albuquerque, N.M., and is part of the Pulsed Power Program, which started at Sandia National Randy Montoya/Sandia National Laboratory hide caption

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