SpaceX launched an upgraded version of its Falcon 9 rocket Sept. 30 from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, northwest of Los Angeles. SpaceX hide caption

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SpaceX

World's Largest Neutrino Telescope Buried in Antarctic Ice

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A bubble in space: Abell 39 marks the death of a star like the sun. Wind from the aging central star pushes into the surrounding interstellar gas, building up a dense shell that glows blue in this image. After 36 years of travel, the Voyager spacecraft is just now reaching the edge of the sun's own wind-blown bubble. WIYN/NOAO/NSF hide caption

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WIYN/NOAO/NSF

Japan's new solid-fuel rocket lifts off from the launch pad at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Uchinoura Space Center in Kimotsuki, Kagoshima prefecture, on Japan's southern island of Kyushu Saturday. Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images

Are We There Yet? Voyager 1 Finally Answers 'Yes'

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This artist's illustration shows the Voyager 1 space probe. The spacecraft was launched on Sept. 5, 1977, and as of August 2012, it is outside the bubble of hot gas, known as the "heliopause," that radiates from the sun. NASA/Landov hide caption

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NASA/Landov

See Ya, Voyager: Probe Has Finally Entered Interstellar Space

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NASA's Latest Mission To The Moon Is On Track

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NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks before Friday night's launch of the LADEE moon orbiter. The craft has run into a small technical issue, NASA says, which it will fix before it arrives at the moon next month. Carla Cioffi/NASA hide caption

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Carla Cioffi/NASA

NASA Craft to Sniff Moondust, Test Laser Broadband

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