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David Reitze of the California Institute of Technology and the executive director of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO, speaks at the National Press Club in Washington on Oct. 16. He talks of one of the most violent events in the cosmos, the collision of neuron stars, that was witnessed completely for the first time in August. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Scott Kelly is seen floating during a spacewalk in 2015. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Getty Images

Astronaut Scott Kelly's Latest Mission: A Book

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The collision of two neutron stars, seen in an artist's rendering, created both gravitational waves and gamma rays. Researchers used those signals to locate the event with optical telescopes. Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science hide caption

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Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science

Astronomers Strike Gravitational Gold In Colliding Neutron Stars

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The Voyager Golden Record remained mostly unavailable and unheard, until a Kickstarter campaign finally brought the sounds to human ears. Ozma Records/LADdesign hide caption

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Ozma Records/LADdesign

The Voyager Golden Record Finally Finds An Earthly Audience

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What Would Aliens Make Of NASA's Voyager?

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An artist's depiction of two black holes colliding. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Gravitational Wave Detector In Italy Saw Wave Pass Through Earth In August

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Until it was surpassed recently by a similar instrument in China, the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico, completed in 1963, was the world's single largest. Seth Shostak/AP hide caption

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Seth Shostak/AP

Puerto Rico's Arecibo Radio Telescope Suffers Hurricane Damage

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An artist's depiction of Planet Nine. The object is thought to be gaseous, similar to Uranus and Neptune. Hypothetical lightning lights up the night side. Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC) hide caption

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Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC)

Astronomers Search For Giant Planet On Outer Edges Of Solar System

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An annual space law moot court competition imagines a future legal case set in space, where issues of liability and sovereignty can get extra complicated. Stocktrek Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stocktrek Images/Getty Images

An Accident On The Moon, Young Lawyers To The Rescue

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A jet emanating from galaxy M87 can be seen in this July 6, 2000, photo taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. J.A. Biretta, Hubble Heritage Team/NASA hide caption

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J.A. Biretta, Hubble Heritage Team/NASA