Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield has spent a total of six months in space. In his new book, he writes that getting to space took only "8 minutes and 42 seconds. Give or take a few thousand days of training." NASA/Courtesy of Little, Brown and Company hide caption

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NASA/Courtesy of Little, Brown and Company

Astronaut Chris Hadfield Brings Lessons From Space Down To Earth

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Your direct connection with the stars and all of the space in between them. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

How To See Forever On Your Dirty Car

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Science Goes to the Movies: 'Gravity'

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NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer probe, seen in this artist's rendering, is orbiting the moon to gather detailed information about the lunar surface. Dana Berry/NASA hide caption

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Dana Berry/NASA

Netflix On The Moon? Broadband Makes It To Deep Space

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If Gravity carries a clear message, it is that the universe is hostile to life. Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures hide caption

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Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

Even if we find other life out there, in the depths of space, life here will still be a rare gem that must be worshipped and preserved at all costs. ESO hide caption

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ESO

A photo composed of nearly 900 images taken by the rover Curiosity shows a section of Gale Crater near the equator of Mars. The rovers are continuing to work through the U.S. government shutdown. NASA/AP hide caption

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NASA/AP

Why Is The Higgs Boson A 'Big Whoop' For All Of Us?

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British theoretical physicist Peter Higgs (left) and Belgian theoretical physicist Francois Englert were awarded the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images