A reconstruction of a Neanderthal man (right) based on skull found at the La Ferrassie rock shelter in Dordogne Valley, France. He's face to face with a male Homo sapien. Philippe Plailly & Atelier Daynes/Science Source hide caption

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The Flint River is pictured in downtown Flint, Mich., on Feb. 4. The city's water problems began when it switched to using the Flint River for its supply in 2014. They were exacerbated by government officials' failure to disclose and stop the leaching of lead and other toxins into the water. Laura McDermott for NPR hide caption

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The West Kensington Ministry church in Philadelphia, seen here in 2014, is one of about a dozen churches offering sanctuary to Central American immigrants who are under deportation orders. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Jeneyah McDonald stands amid cases of bottled water in the kitchen of her home in Flint, Mich. Before water donations arrived in Flint, McDonald says, she spent an estimated $100 out of her $300 weekly grocery bill buying safe water for her family. Laura McDermott for NPR hide caption

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December brought storm clouds to the Porter Ranch neighborhood in Southern California's San Fernando Valley. David McNew/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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But first, birth control? John Fedele/Blend Images RM/Getty Images hide caption

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During more cordial times, Donald Trump (left) talks with New Hampshire Union Leader Publisher Joe McQuaid during a Politics and Eggs breakfast in Manchester, N.H., in 2014. Jim Cole/AP hide caption

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This San Francisco home collapsed in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, which also claimed dozens of lives. ADAM TEITELBAUM/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Shirley Jones and Robert Preston star in 1962's The Music Man, about a con man who poses as a band leader. Warner Bros./The Kobal Collection hide caption

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Cuba's cars are impossible to ignore. It's like seeing a celebrity and trying not to stare. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Latin America

'Car Talk' In Cuba: How Those Classic American Cars Survived The Embargo

Car Talk's Ray Magliozzi is in Cuba. He talks to Robert Siegel about the old American cars he's seeing on the streets of Havana.

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Ben Haggerty, a.k.a. Macklemore, and Jamila Woods collaborated on the song "White Privilege II." Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Supporters of same-sex civil union gathered last Saturday in central Rome. Italy is the only major Western European country that has not legalized same-sex marriage or civil unions. The Senate plans to take up the question of civil unions on Thursday. Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Aedes aegypti mosquito is one of two types thought to be capable of carrying and transmitting the Zika virus. Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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(Top, left) In an exercise designed to open up the conversation between veterans and teenagers, Navy veteran Jamal McPherson waits for others to ask him questions. (Top, right) Veteran Mikhail Dasovich, who served as a Marine in Sangin in Afghanistan, shares his tattoos with participants. (Bottom) Bocanegra speaks at the start of the day's program. Alyssa Schukar for NPR hide caption

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Katerina Maylock teaches a college test preparation class at Holton Arms School in Bethesda, Md. The current version of the SAT college entrance exam is having its final run, when thousands of students nationwide will sit, squirm or stress through the nearly four-hour reading, writing and math test. A new revamped version debuts in March. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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NPR Ed

A History Of The SAT In 4 Questions

The SAT has gone through big changes since 1926. The test reflects the nation's biases and times. Here's our subjective tour of the exam's history — in four questions.

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Hillary Clinton stands for a portrait in San Antonio. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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A young immigration activist holds a sign reading "It's in your hands Mr. President" during a rally calling on President Obama to suspend deportations in 2013. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Amy Thomson holds 2-month-old Isla in Seattle Children's Hospital in early 2014. When the Thomson family learned Isla's heart was failing, they took an air ambulance from Butte, Mont., to Seattle to get medical care. Courtesy of the Thomson family hide caption

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President Obama gives his State of the Union address in Washington on Tuesday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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A South Korean soldier stands next to loudspeakers near the border with North Korea on Jan. 8. South Korea responded to the North's latest nuclear test by resuming the broadcasts that include news, criticism of the North Korean regime and pop music. Lim Tae-hoon/AP hide caption

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Parallels

Responding To Nuclear Test, S. Korea Cranks Up The K-Pop

South Korea is again blaring news, music and propaganda from banks of loudspeakers along the border. At a minimum, it seems to annoy North Korea.

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Part of the main street in Hilo, Hawaii, was flattened by a tsunami in April 1946. That big wave was triggered by a quake near the Aleutian Islands, where the edges of two tectonic plates continue to collide. Bettmann/Corbis hide caption

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David Bowie performing with Tin Machine guitarist Reeves Gabrels in 1991. Kevin.Mazur/WireImage/Getty Images hide caption

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Music News

A Guitarist Remembers: David Bowie Just Wanted A Good Laugh

"The picture I have in my head is of him cracking up in the studio," Reeves Gabrels says. "Because we just used to be able to make each other laugh."

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Neanderthals, represented here by a museum's reconstruction, had been living in Eurasia for 200,000 years when Homo sapiens first passed through, and the communities intermingled. The same genes that today play a role in allergies very likely fostered a quick response to local bacteria, viruses and other pathogens, scientists say. Pierre Andrieu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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