Teresa MacBain pauses while talking about her ongoing job search. She has been out of work since leaving her position as a Methodist pastor earlier this year. Colin Hackley for NPR hide caption

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From Minister To Atheist: A Story Of Losing Faith
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The National Guard's 182nd Infantry Regiment returned home in March from a year in Afghanistan. One in three said they were unemployed or looking for work. Becky Lettenberger/NPR hide caption

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National Guard Members' Next Battle: The Job Hunt
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Michael Morton and his mother, Patricia Morton, in October after a judge announced him free on bond after nearly 25 years in prison for a wrongful conviction. Courtesy of The Williamson County Sun hide caption

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Free After 25 Years: A Tale Of Murder And Injustice
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Smoke rises as fires burn out of control near Vermont Street in Los Angeles on April 30, 1992. Riots erupted after L.A. police officers were acquitted in the beating of black motorist Rodney King. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Teaching The L.A. Riots At Two City Schools
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American Ariel Hsing competes against Canadian Chris Xu at the table tennis qualifying tournament in Cary, N.C., on April 20. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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American Whiz Rises Up In The World Of Ping-Pong
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Newt Gingrich speaks at Marquette University in Milwaukee on March 29. Rick Wood/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Gingrich's Unconventional White House Bid: A Retrospective
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Cardboard Prom Dress Is Just The Right Fit For This Young Woman
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In politics, video tracking has become normal. And it's a growth industry. There are trackers working for campaigns, political parties and, increasingly, political action committees. iStockphoto hide caption

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When Politicians Slip, Video Trackers Are There
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Undocumented immigrants are searched before boarding a deportation flight in Mesa, Ariz., last June. Since the passage of the state's immigration law two years ago, thousands of illegal workers have left. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Arizona's Illegal Workforce Is Down, So Now What?
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Container ships are positioned under cranes at the Port of Oakland in California. U.S. exports are up more than 30 percent from just two years ago, when President Obama set a goal of doubling U.S. exports in five years. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Made In The USA: An Export Boom
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White Citizens' Council leader Asa Earl Carter denounces school integration in Clinton, Tenn., on Aug. 31, 1956. AP hide caption

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The Artful Reinvention Of Klansman Asa Earl Carter
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Your Salad: A Search For Where The Wild Things Were
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Dick Clark brought in the New Year from Times Square for over three decades. Donna Svennevik/AP/ABC hide caption

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Dick Clark, 'Bandstand' Host, Dies At 82
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Carrying 'Dreams': Why Women Become Surrogates
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In 2010 US Army veteran Jeff Barillaro returned from Iraq with severe PTSD. Since then Barillaro, whose stage name is "Solider Hard," has been rapping about his struggles and performing for troops, veterans, and military families across the US. Erik M. Lunsford/NPR hide caption

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For One Soldier, Rap Is A Powerful Postwar Weapon
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