On April 29, 1975, as Saigon was falling to Communist North Vietnamese forces, a small U.S. Navy destroyer escort ship, the USS Kirk, played a dramatic but almost forgotten role in rescuing up to 30,000 South Vietnamese. Here, a member of the USS Kirk's crew tends to a Vietnamese baby. Hugh Doyle hide caption

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Forgotten Ship: A Daring Rescue As Saigon Fell

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Katherine Hamilton during a 1981 hurdles race when she was a sophomore at Berkeley. Later that year, Hamilton quit the team and walked away from her sport, largely because of the prevalence of performance-enhancing drugs at the top levels of track and field. Courtesy of Martha Edwards hide caption

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Athlete's 'Nope To Dope' Became 'No To Sports'

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Before evacuating from Katrina, Bobbie Jennings (right) lived next door to her twin sister, Gloria Williams, in the public housing that existed on the same site as Harmony Oaks in New Orleans. While Jennings likes the actual apartment, she says she is unhappy with the new development because the new apartments do not provide the same sense of community as before. Katie Hayes/NPR hide caption

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New Orleans' Public Housing Slowly Evolving

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Ray McNair rests under I-95 in Overtown, a historic black neighborhood in Miami that was nearly wiped out during the construction of the interstate. Tom Ervin For NPR hide caption

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Paying A Local Price For I-95's Global Promise

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David Schulte, a marine biologist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is trying to engineer a recovery for Chesapeake Bay oysters. He has developed a small reef area to provide a habitat for oysters in one of the bay's tributaries. Elizabeth Shogren/NPR hide caption

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Shelling Out For A Chesapeake Bay Oyster Comeback

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Peace Corps volunteers cheer as President Obama speaks at the airport in Accra, Ghana, in July 2009. Staying connected to friends and family back home is easier for volunteers these days, thanks to technology. Haraz N. Ghanbari/AP hide caption

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Texting, Skype Alter The Peace Corps Experience

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A screenshot of Egyptian riot police, taken from a video about protests on the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights' YouTube channel. EIPR/YouTube hide caption

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Blogging And Tweeting, Egyptians Push For Change

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Indian workers answer telephone calls at a call center on the outskirts of New Delhi in 2008. Increasingly, American companies are employing U.S. workers to handle customer service calls in their own homes. Findlay Kember/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Outsourced Call Centers Return, To U.S. Homes

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U.S. Marines wait for the beginning of the dedication ceremony of the National Museum of the Marine Corps in November 2006 in Quantico, Va. For more than 200 years, the Marine Corps has been hitting the beaches. But over the past decade, the Marines have operated like a smaller Army in Iraq and Afghanistan, far from the water's edge. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Marines Need To Regain 'Maritime Soul,' Gates Says

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Sharon Hanshaw, a beautician turned global climate activist living in Biloxi, Miss., has traveled the world to tell the story of how her neighborhood has struggled to recover from Hurricane Katrina. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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A Hard Fight For A Political Voice In Biloxi, Miss.

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A new poll by Pew Research says that only 1 person in 3 knows President Obama is a Christian, while nearly 1 in 5 thinks he's a Muslim. Andrew Wardlow/AP hide caption

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Obama's Personal Faith Leaves Public Wondering

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A stretch of I-95 near the Newark Airport in New Jersey. Timothy Bell For NPR hide caption

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Starting A Journey On I-95, The Road Most Traveled

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The Campo Kumeyaay Nation, a desert tribe east of San Diego, currently leases land to the only large-scale renewable power facility on tribal land in the country. Amy Standen/KQED hide caption

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Tribal Lands Struggle To Bring Clean Power Online

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In Tenn., Mosque Location Isn't The Issue: Religion Is

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