The Splinter Bike, built by carpenter Michael Thompson. Courtesy Michael Thompson hide caption

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The horses hit the 1-mile mark during the 1901 Kentucky Derby. Library of Congress hide caption

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Long associated with the Middle Ages, mead, a fermented honey wine, is making a comeback — and not just at Renaissance fairs. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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LeapFrog's My Pal Scout can be programmed to say a child's name by plugging it into an online database. LeapFrog only records new names after three people have requested it. Courtesy of LeapFrog hide caption

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Pop Culture

Ever Wonder About The Voice Behind The Toy?

Peter Hartlaub, a pop critic at the San Francisco Chronicle, has given himself a year to track down the voices behind his children's talking toys.

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Captain Hook (left) and her accomplice, Vanessa XKiller, vandalize a bear statue in L.A.'s Griffith Park in the most cozy way possible: with a hand-crocheted hoodie. Stepping back to assess their handiwork, Vanessa concludes, it's "gangster cute." Jennifer Sharpe/via Flickr hide caption

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The King James Bible, published in 1611, celebrates its 400th birthday this year. Above, a 1754 illustration depicts a group of robed translators presenting a bible to King James I. The king commissioned the new translation in 1604, and for the next seven years, 47 scholars and theologians worked through the Bible line by line. Illustration by George E. Kruger/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Illustration by George E. Kruger/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

University of Virginia baseball player Will Roberts pitched a perfect game this spring. The sports website Deadspin determined that coverage by a news-generating software program better captured the essence of the game than a human-authored account. Jim Daves/UVA Media Relations hide caption

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