Books That Changed the World: Origin of Species : Blog Of The Nation Most of us learned about Darwin's theory of evolution in grade school science class. But, you probably never read the actual book with the never ending title,
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Books That Changed the World: Origin of Species

Books That Changed the World: Origin of Species

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9245938/126958231" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Most of us learned about Darwin's theory of evolution in grade school science class. But, you probably never read the actual book with the never ending title, On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. Luckily, you don't have to. Janet Browne already did, and she wrote a concise, easy to read biography of the book. If you know her name, it's probably because she's the one who wrote a two-volume biography of Charles Darwin. This is the next in our series, Books that Changed the World. And Browne will explain why she thinks "Origin of Species" is not only the greatest science book ever published, but also one of the easiest to read. Still, fortunately for all of us, the biography is much shorter than the original.