Predicting Violence : Blog Of The Nation As we heard on the show yesterday, the suspected gunman in the Virginia Tech shootings showed signs of
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Predicting Violence

Predicting Violence

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As we heard on the show yesterday, the suspected gunman in the Virginia Tech shootings showed signs of trouble long before Monday. VT Professor Lucinda Roy told us that she was "very concerned" about Seung-Hui Cho and tried to reach out to the police, and counselors, to try to get help. Back in 2005, we heard this morning, Cho reportedly was accused of stalking two female students at VT. He was also taken to a mental health facility over worries that he was suicidal. All of which makes you wonder, could this have been prevented? Nobody knows for sure what drove Cho to violence on Monday morning, and we will likely never know. But, can violence ever be predicted?