The Opinion Page: One of Us : Blog Of The Nation Last week at this time, we were all glued to our TV sets, watching the awful news out of Virginia Tech. As the number of dead and injured grew, we all understood the depth of the tragedy, but nobody knew the identity of the killer. As the day wore...
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The Opinion Page: One of Us

The Opinion Page: One of Us

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Last week at this time, we were all glued to our TV sets, watching the awful news out of Virginia Tech. As the number of dead and injured grew, we all understood the depth of the tragedy, but nobody knew the identity of the killer. As the day wore on, and rumors leaked out that the shooter might be Asian, many Asian Americans felt a sense of dread. And, when Seung-Hui Cho was identified, some in the Korean American community confronted a sense of shared responsibility. In an op-ed last week in the Los Angeles Times, Edward Taehan Chang, himself Korean-American, argued that he will not be able to completely shake his sense of responsibility for the tragedy, but he will try. The real lesson of Blacksburg, he says, is that we all need to reach across ethnic lines and racial boundaries to help people see that violence is never the answer. Is this sense of shared responsibility common among ethnic groups? Do you feel worse if you resemble the perpetrator of a crime?