NPR logo

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10579515/126956153" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
ZZZzzzzZZZZZzz...

ZZZzzzzZZZZZzz...

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10579515/126956153" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

How much sleep did you get last night? I think I was asleep by midnight, and my alarm went off at 6:30am, so I count six-and-a-half hours. Today I feel pretty good, though I may have yawned a couple of times at our morning editorial meeting... but we all know we're supposed to get about eight hours of sleep. We know it, but do we care? According to the National Sleep Foundation, nope — whereas almost 40% of adults were getting their nightly eight in 2001, these days only about a quarter do. I know I should get more, but then I think, "Well, if I get a medium coffee in the morning instead of a small, I can stay up for another hour or so..." What do you tell yourself to rationalize the sleep you're not getting?

UPDATE: The email address Dr. Dement gave out to take part in the study on obstructive sleep apnea (it's only near Boston, Tucson, Walla Walla, Stanford, or St. Louis) is: sleep.fmri@yahoo.com

NPR thanks our sponsors