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What's the Cheat Code for Middle East Peace?

What's the Cheat Code for Middle East Peace?

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Educational video games are nothing new... you can learn all about human interaction with the SIMS, engineer giant structures with Roller Coaster Tycoon, and even let games teach your kids how to read and do arithmetic. But what if you could actually learn how to save the world with a video game? Well, guess what? You can! Want to figure out how to feed zillions of starving refugees in Africa? Try the UN's game, Food Force. Want to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian crisis in Gaza? There's a game for that too, called Peacemaker. As much as I'm sure Mario wants to rescue the princess (whenever I play, she's always in another castle... dang it!), somehow these games seem a little more worthwhile. Still... do you want to learn from your video game, or do you want to just zone out? Does this make gaming like homework? And isn't it a little depressing if you lose?