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Who are the New Media Moguls?

Who are the New Media Moguls?

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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They say the first step to recovery is admitting you have a problem, so here it goes: My name is Andy Carvin, and I'm an Iced Decaf Venti Americano Addict.

There, I said it. Deep breath....

I'm sure I'm not the only one who struggles getting through an afternoon without some type of dose from their local Starbucks. But perhaps their influence on me and countless other people is worse than I imagined. A couple years ago I suddenly found myself having the urge to by an album by singer Madeleine Peyroux. Her easygoing Parisian cafe jazz with strong whiffs of Billie Holiday was almost as addictive as, well, that iced decaf venti Americano I always long for.

No wonder - not long after Peyroux released her album Careless Love, she entered into a relationship with Starbucks, getting her CD into the ears of millions of my fellow coffee addicts. The model proved so successful that Sir Paul McCartney is releasing his newest album on Starbucks' music label.

Starbucks and Paul McCartney are just some of the "new music moguls" recently profiled by Fast Company magazine. They also take a look at the growing trend of introducing music through video games. Video game maker Electronic Arts expects to sign as many as half a dozen musical acts by the end of the year, while bands like Jonny Lives! have benefited from seeing their songs placed within games. The band also jumped on an opportunity to partner with mobile phone manufacturer Nokia to use one of their video phones to record a music video.

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Fast Company has their list of the new media moguls. Who would you include on your own list? Personally, I'd start by adding you and me. All you have to do is look at the number of up-and-coming bands on social networking sites like MySpace and Bebo, you'll get a sense of the power we all have in helping musicians sink or float. And as music-oriented social networking sites continue to grow, our collective influence as music moguls will grow, too. So when the next OK Go single goes platinum, we should all get a framed silvery disc we can stick on our walls, right?

Anyway, enough of that. I need to make another Starbucks run.

NPR Internet strategist Andy Carvin is subbing for Sarah and Barrie while they enjoy what's left of their vacations.