Running in Place in NOLA : Blog Of The Nation President Bush spoke at a charter school in New Orleans this morning, and assured the residents that the federal government understands their needs and it's "still engaged."
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Running in Place in NOLA

Running in Place in NOLA

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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President Bush spoke at a charter school in New Orleans this morning, and assured the residents that the federal government understands their needs and it's "still engaged." History professor Douglas Brinkley might doubt those words... he thinks the Bush administration has a strategy of inaction for New Orleans, that the hope is residents of the below-sea-level areas will abandon their homes, like those in Galveston did after the disastrous 1900 hurricane. He paints a doom-filled picture of NOLA's future, but the most interesting bit, I think, is the way he tries to re-frame how we think about Katrina:

Unfortunately, one of the biggest misperceptions the American public harbors is that Katrina was a week-long catastrophe. In truth, it's better to view it as an era. Remember, the Dust Bowl of the 1930s lasted eight or nine years. We're still in the middle of the Katrina saga.

Have you been to New Orleans since Katrina? Did you help rebuild... and did you just feel like you were spinning your wheels?