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Tracking Sex Offenders

Tracking Sex Offenders

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If there was a convicted sex offender living on your street, you'd want to know about it, right? Or maybe you don't. Either way, it's a fairly common knee-jerk reaction, particularly if you're a single female concerned about your safety, and especially if you've got kids. But Human Rights Watch has a new report, and it says these registries are inhumane and don't protect anyone from crime because the old adage, "once a sex offender, always a sex offender" isn't actually true. Plus, you can end up on these registries for offenses as mild as public urination. Should there be limits to who can access these registries, or who is listed on them? Also, have you checked out the information on your community? How has it affected your choices about where to live, where to walk, or where to let your children play?