NPR logo

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14323589/14324756" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
IR[e]AQtion

IR[e]AQtion

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14323589/14324756" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In hours and hours of testimony on Capitol Hill, Ambassador Ryan Crocker and General David Petraeus have indicated that the so-called surge is working (even if their microphones aren't). But they need more time. Today we'll turn to two reporters, two estimable Iraq analysts, and you.

Are you paying attention to what Ambassador Crocker and General Petraeus are saying today? What do you think about what they said yesterday? Have you tuned into our live coverage, from the Hill? Have Crocker and Petraeus assured you that we've made strides? Or have they reassured you that we haven't?

We'll hear from our own Anne Garrels, who is in Combat Outpost Apache. She told Steve Inskeep, of Morning Edition, that she has noticed "dramatic improvements" in Adhamiyah, the Sunni enclave from which she has been reporting.

Gordon Lubold, of The Christian Science Monitor, is also in Iraq, burning the midnight oil. And eating ice cream, apparently.

P.J. Crowley, who advised President Clinton on national security affairs, is now at the Center for American Progress, here in Washington. He argues that the Bush Administration should focus more on Iraq's political transformation and the so-called war of ideas.

And finally, Michael O'Hanlon, of the Brookings Institution, will give us his reaction to the hearings. After a recent trip to Iraq, he co-authored a now-notorious opinion piece for The New York Times. O'Hanlon is on Capitol Hill, watching the hearings unfold. If all goes according to plan, he'll step outside Room 216, into the Hart Senate Office Building's modern, marble halls, to give us a call on his cell phone.

NPR thanks our sponsors