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Outs and Ins of Outing

Outs and Ins of Outing

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Larry Craig has vociferously denied that he is gay, but the allegations have plagued him for a long time now. Question is, whose business is it? "Outing" is a tricky subject — for a long time there was an unspoken rule about the homosexuality of public figures: it's strictly a private matter, to be ignored or sometimes even deliberately covered up by the press. But since the press has enlarged to include everyone with a computer, and homophobia slowly and steadily has declined, "outing" has become more and more popular. Mike Rogers runs a blog that "reports on closeted hypocrites in the government who work against the gay and lesbian community." And there's the crux of it: some people believe that hypocrisy is a reason to make something that used to be nobody's business... everyone's. We'll talk to him today, as well as crisis management and journalist folks, about the ethics of outing. What do you think?

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