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Anatomy of Your Nightmare

Anatomy of Your Nightmare

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I've always been fascinated by dreams. Partly because I like to psychoanalyze myself to death, and partly because I'm secretly convinced that my dreams are premonitions.* Nightmares, though, are a particularly interesting subset. They represent our greatest, albeit subconscious, fears; and are often characterized by panting, sweating, and, in some cases, a loud shriek. Ever wonder why you jolt upright in bed at the pinnacle of the chase, or what that furry man dressed like a peacock carrying a pitchfork is supposed to represent? Today, we'll talk to The New York Times science columnist Natalie Angier about why we have nightmares in the first place and the evolutionary function they serve; and to Kelly Buckeley, dream interpreter extraordinaire. So tell us: what was your worst nightmare? Do you have any recurring dreams? And who secretly thinks their dreams are premonitions? Be honest.

* Two of them have, in fact, come true. Sort of.