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Junkie for President! (just imagine the campaign button)

Junkie for President! (just imagine the campaign button)

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/15589309/15597385" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Now that Stephen Colbert is a "candidate" for president in both parties (and polling in the single digits, by the way), the news media needs to figure out how to cover this (not to mention what will happen to his show if he actually turns up on a ballot somewhere, a la Fred Thompson and Law & Order). You know these are strange days when Colbert plays it straight on Meet the Press while Tim Russert waves a Bert doll and demands to know why "Ernie & Bert" aren't pronounced "Ernie" and "bear." Ana Marie Cox had the right take on this one at Time's Swampland blog:

His interview yesterday was painfully so-ironic-it-was-unironic, and induced the kind of cringes you usually associate with Larry Craig. Russert tried way too hard, Colbert maybe not hard enough, or maybe there's something about "fake newsers" actively participating in "real" news that forces you to realize there's no hope for either genre.

We'll drag her into the Political Junkie fray, to talk a bit about the fake "news" man's candidacy, and the dangers of real newsmen taking the funny-bait.

And there's plenty more to talk about with Ken Rudin: Mitt Romney's Osama/Obama mixup, Sam Brownback's graceful exit, and the most recent Republican debate, among other things.

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