Look at Me, Look at Me! : Blog Of The Nation Online social networks like MySpace and Facebook appeal to our egos (and, no, I'm not talking about Freud).
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Look at Me, Look at Me!

Look at Me, Look at Me!

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' Topic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14992951/14993500" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

My mom, a high school teacher, once asked me what Facebook was: "What's this Face thing that all my students are talking about?" I told her it's an online social network that connects you with friends, work colleagues, kindergarten crushes, etc. But that's only part of the story. The other part — the deeper truth — is that sites like MySpace and Facebook are vehicles of narcissism. Think about it... you're saying to the world, "I think highly enough about myself that I'm going to create a web page dedicated solely to me and my greatness — and available for all to see and comment on. And I'm going to put up 23 photo albums of me and my friends, documenting every seemingly insignificant detail of my life. Except I don't really think it's insignificant because I uploaded 50 pictures of the same exact thing, but each from a slightly different angle, with a slightly different pose." Do not be alarmed, this is not a derisive critique of the Face and the Space. To the contrary, I embrace this virtual self-indulgence, I celebrate it. And that's why I've created a photo album entitled, "Do You Have Sufficient Pictures of Me?" filled with numerous stylized portraits of myself. 'Cause let's be real: these interactive networks are nothing but a stalker's paradise. And I like to make it easy for them.