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Myanmar: Monks vs. the Military

Myanmar: Monks vs. the Military

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Myanmar (the erstwhile Burma), is in the midst of a shaky political moment. Photos of monks in their deep red robes have captivated the world as they march against a military junta that has kept Myanmar under military rule since 1962. The last round of demonstrations for political reforms led to a bloodbath... with almost 600 monks dead. And though there was hope that this demonstration will end happily, right now, it looks like the junta is winning. The marches have dwindled away; monks have been killed, arrested, or confined to their monasteries. The monks and monasteries have had a unique role in Myanmar — they're a sort of moral compass for the country. We're going to talk with Philip Delves Broughton about these mysterious maroon figures today, for a closer look inside a country in political and social extremis. You can read his op-ed here.