Stranger in Your House : Blog Of The Nation Parents at their wits' end
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Stranger in Your House

Stranger in Your House

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I think my parents would agree that I was a difficult teenager in some (most?) ways. My mother regularly caught me cutting school — bored by life, chain smoking — at the local coffee shop. This, of course, made me not only difficult, but monumentally stupid — why I couldn't find a hangout my mother didn't frequent, I'll never know. Years later, I think we can all agree that not only could it have been worse, but I was probably on the easy side. Parents with children who were affectionate and intimate in their early years, can end up with depressed, addicted, and venomous children who desperately need help, but cannot accept it. So-called "Boot Camps" have been in the news lately — they can be terrifying, costly, and worse, unregulated. But what on earth are your options when it feels like you've been through all of them? We'll talk to the author of the wonderful memoir Augusta, Gone (she described interacting with her troubled daughter, "like sticking my hand into the garbage disposal,"), and we're hoping that her story, along with help from Amy Dickinson and Maia Szalavitz, will inspire you to tell yours here. Parents, teenagers — what was your experience?