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Surviving Iraq

Surviving Iraq

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Reporting on the war in Iraq often boils down to numbers... number of attacks, number of troops injured, or killed. And if you look closer at the figures, you'll see at least one bit of good news: The number of US service members who survive serious injuries in Iraq is higher than in any other U.S. conflict. That means more troops make it out of Iraq alive. It also means that they survive long enough to develop all sorts of serious, and rare, side-effects... complications that doctors don't always know how to treat. In May of 2006, CBS News correspondent Kimberly Dozier went from reporter to newsmaker. A 500-pound car bomb went off as the U.S. Army patrol she was riding with drove down a Baghdad street. She's almost fully recovered now, and in an op-ed in the Washington Post yesterday she stresses that victims of war injuries need more funding for research... to treat their injuries, and to study these side-effects. She'll join us today to talk about what happened to her, and what she's trying to do to help.

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