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A Lake of Fire

A Lake of Fire

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Abortion. Let's just get that out there... this is a tough topic to talk about in any circle, and Lake of Fire is a tough movie to watch by any measure. Not that it's a bad film; in fact, it's a powerful documentary that tries hard to give both sides equal time, if not equal treatment, as some reviewers argue. Tony Kaye (he also did American History X) spent 16 years putting Lake of Fire together, and he calls his 2 1/2 hour film "the definitive work on the subject of abortion." His message: This isn't so much a debate, as a war. And that sense of urgency comes across in the gritty black and white images of protests, counter-protests, stump speeches, and actual abortions. One reviewer described it as,

an insurmountably rude provocation that's also necessary: a sprawling, maddeningly uneven, at times profoundly upsetting 2 1/2-hour documentary essay that forces us to ask what, precisely, abortion means to the women who have one, to the people who oppose it, and to ourselves. If you even think you have an opinion on the subject, the movie's essential viewing.

Today, we'll talk with Tony Kaye and hopefully find out more about the film, the people in it, and the message he is trying to get across.

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I hope that Peter Singer was allowed to clearly articulate his view of the ethics of abortion. If so, that alone will make this film worthy of our attention.

Sent by Steve Barney | 3:33 PM | 11-1-2007