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Black and White Income Disparity

Black and White Income Disparity

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Forty years after the civil rights movement, and we're still a ways off from reaching income parity among blacks and whites. A new study from Pew Charitable Trusts and Julia Isaacs of the Brookings Institution has revealed that incomes have increased over the last thirty years among black and white families as a whole — largely due to the fact that more women are (kicking butt) in the workforce (go us!) — but that the increase was greater for white families. Based on data from some 2,300 families, white children are more likely to make more than their parents and move up the economic ladder, while black children are more likely to make less than their parents and fall down the ladder. Today we'll talk to Julia Isaacs, Clarence Page, and Thomas Shapiro to try and figure out why this disparity still persists, and what can (should) be done to correct it.

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