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Blaming the Botoxed

Blaming the Botoxed

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Kanye and Donda West, May 2007. Source: Vince Bucci/Getty Images hide caption

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Source: Vince Bucci/Getty Images

I admit it. I went through a pretty serious Nip/Tuck phase, watched I Want A Famous Face, and have even tuned in to the occasional Dr. 90210. For whatever reason, I, like many, am captivated by stories of transformation through plastic surgery (though, for some reason, I absolutely cannot watch nose jobs. There's something about the chiseling that churns my stomach). And though these shows are sensational, graphic, voyeuristic, and possibly exploitative, I actually think they've taught me something: There are all kinds of plastic surgery patients. It's not just about narcissism, so don't be too quick to judge the patients. Washington Post Fashion editor Robin Givhan takes it a step further, defending the most-maligned sector, those for whom it IS about vanity. In a day when celebrities never seem to age much, we suspect they've had work done, but praise their beauty anyway. But oh, if we find out allegations of cosmetic surgery are true? They're damned. It's a double standard... so what makes it ok?

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