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Comics, Hookahs, and <em>Cairo</em>

Comics, Hookahs, and Cairo

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Neal talks with the author of a new graphic novel, Cairo, on the show today. It's the first comic written by G. Willow Wilson, and she'll fill us in on the story, and what it was like to write a comic book. She was also nice enough to do a little guest blogging for us...

For the first time in my adult life, I'm living in my own country.
I've discovered that adulthood doesn't mean the same thing in the US as it does in Egypt, and the skills I learned in the marketplaces of Cairo don't translate into the skills I need in the supermarkets of Seattle. I can bargain over the price of a live chicken with the best of them, but buying health insurance leaves me totally confused.
However, one thing that translates without fail is a healthy sense of the absurd. Flying prayer-mats and genies in hookahs are as funny here as they are in Egypt, and when I tell people I've written a graphic novel about them, the response is almost always a delighted "Really?" (Or in Egypt, "Begad?") Who knew that a book I wrote about a city on the other side of the world could become the bridge I cross to get back home.

- G. Willow Wilson

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