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God is My Co-Candidate

God is My Co-Candidate

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Whatever your personal stance on religion — faithful in any denomination to agnostic to atheist — it likely informs your life in some way. This is obvious if you practice a religion and adhere to its teachings (or try to), but it's true even if you're an agnostic or an atheist... not being religious can be every bit as contentious as being religious. Either way, it's going to come up. More and more, it's coming up on the campaign trails, says our op ed author this week, Jonathan Turley. He credits our current President with getting the ball rolling during the 2000 primary, when he named Christ as his favorite political philospher. Since then, candidates on both sides have consistently claimed personal relationships with God. So what about the other, not-so-shiny parts of their private lives? The parts where, perhaps, they've violated the religious tenets they proclaim to follow? Turley says if they're claiming faith, the "flock" — voters — has a right to "question the shepherd." What do you think?

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