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Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving! Source: David Gura hide caption

toggle caption Source: David Gura

Families around the country are sitting down to dinner. But at many tables, there are people missing. Maybe a son's train or a daughter's flight is delayed... Or a close friend has to work... Or a relative decided she didn't want to make a long trek home... Or a father or mother is overseas. I won't attempt to top Sarah's post, "A Traditional Turkey Day," about her family and Thanksgiving. It's a good read. In the first hour of today's show, we want to hear who won't be at your Thanksgiving dinner this year. Where will they be instead? What are you doing to remember them?



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An especially warm Thanksgiving to all other families celebrating with a family member overseas. My candle is lit for my son serving in Afghanistan with a litany for all those in harm's way.

Sent by ollie coale | 2:31 PM | 11-22-2007

I'm in my first semester of graduate school up in Ohio and won't be seeing my family in North Carolina today. But I can't complain. Since I am in grad school, I'm no longer work in retail. So for the first time in 8 years I won't have to work Black Friday and that's more than enough to give thanks for!

Sent by Stacy | 2:32 PM | 11-22-2007

Give us a break Amy!!!

Not everyone can afford to dress up for the holiday due to losing their job; illness or other hardships. Would you rather not have the person there or just be glad they made it this year? or maybe you would rather just not invite them so you aren't embarrassed???

We have a family who doesn't live anywhere near us due to our choice. This family has never been there for us in over 40 years with the ups and downs in our life. if we get into trouble which we did several years back; we cant turn to them for help because they wrote us off years ago and no many how we try; we will never be a part of this family and if we were dead or dying don't let them know because they don't care.

Amy is acting like one size fits all but the guy who called is right in that people should be glad the family is there; no matter what the differences in the family; they at least have each other.

Sent by annoymous | 2:32 PM | 11-22-2007

Our dear friend Claire, who had spent the past four Thanksgivings with us, died suddenly in October. And our niece and cousin, Elizabeth, who was a student at UMass Amherst, and had spent the past four Thanksgivings with us, graduated last spring and moved to Arizona. So, our small family of three was at a bit of a loss as this year's holiday approached. However, good friends from Florida will be visiting their daughter in Medford this holiday and their daughter has invited us to join them. We're taking Claire's pumpkin cheesecake, which was always a highlight of our Thanksgiving dinners, to celebrate her life, remember her, and to share with our friends.

Sent by Sue | 2:34 PM | 11-22-2007

who's not at Thanksgiving - ME.

I'm one of those people living alone distant from family. My family members have never invited me to visit for Thanksgiving, and I wouldn't dream of inviting myself. They're involved with their kids and in-laws, and, I suspect, just never think of me, or assume I'm at someone else's table. And sometimes I am. But usually I'm not. And, besides, friends and neighbors aren't family.

So remind your listeners to consider *inviting* even distant relatives or friends. I'd be happy to hop on a plane to some places. But I'm not going to say anything and risk guilting them into an invitation they don't want to make.

Sent by Nancy | 2:46 PM | 11-22-2007

Talk of the Nation: Who missing from Thanksgiving

Thanksgivings were my favorite childhood holiday. We had thanksgiving dinner in the squeaky clean, unfinished basement of my step-grandparents' small, modest home. Plywood and saw horses created the picnic table. We got root beer floats for desert and then played board games until time to head home to bed. It was just a warm, relaxing atmosphere. Other holidays were spent with relatives in big fancy houses with lots of competition and the resulting tense atmosphere. There are many things I love remembering about my step-grandparents.

Going to my step-grandparents???' house was no longer an option when my children were little. We had some more distant relatives of whom Helen was the senior matriarch who we had visited when our boys were little. My 4 year old son asked, "What is Helen doing?" when asked what he would like to do for Thanksgiving. We have chosen only warm, friendly, non-competitive holiday celebrations ever since. Today we go to our son's home to celebrate a down-home Thanksgiving with his family, Helen's 75 year old daughter and other casual folks.


Sent by Levi Cannon | 3:16 PM | 11-22-2007

I've been the one absent the past several years since I moved to London. Every year at this time I have to renew my visa, so the home office has my passport. I can't go home. Some of your listeners' stories were very moving and the entire show kept me on the brink of tears; then when the final guest was from Omaha (my home town) the flood gates broke.

To all those having a hard time this holiday season, I'm right there with you. But I always remember some of the best advice my mom ever gave me: "Just because the government sanctions this day to be a 'special day' doesn't mean it will be for you. Your special day my be a Tuesday in May, and no matter what, you are loved everyday".

Sent by Frankie | 6:59 AM | 11-24-2007

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