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The Worst Generation?

The Worst Generation?

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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Tom Brokaw, in Studio 3A. Source:Coburn Dukehart, NPR hide caption

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Source:Coburn Dukehart, NPR

For more than 20 years, Tom Brokaw anchored the NBC Nightly News, a broadcast that regularly bested its rivals. Viewers liked his warmth and courteousness. And that accent! Is that how everyone from South Dakota talks?! Brokaw, who was born in 1940, became a reporter in the 1960s, covering the Midwest and the South. When NBC News called, asking him to come to California, to report on Ronald Reagan, Richard Nixon, and Haight-Ashbury, Brokaw said "yes." The rest, as they say, is history. He went on to The White House, The Today Show, and the evening news.

In a new book, Boom! Voices of the Sixties, the former anchorman chronicles the cultural, social, and political sea changes that defined the 1960s. It is equal parts memoir and oral history, with commentary from Americans who came of age then. Pat Buchanan, Nora Ephron, Judy Collins, Jann Wenner, Bill Clinton, Newt Gingrich, James Taylor, Warren Beatty, and dozens of others. You can read an excerpt from it here.

Tom Brokaw joins us, in the second hour, to talk about what was a turbulent, important decade. And a big one, too! (As all decades are, really). We'll focus on 1968, in particular. How did that year change you? And the country?

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