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Waterboarding is Exactly As Much Fun As It Looks Like It Is

Waterboarding is Exactly As Much Fun As It Looks Like It Is

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/16009919/16012888" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Current's Kaj Larsen is waterboarded. Source: Current.com hide caption

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Source: Current.com

There's been a lot of talk about what constitutes torture lately, mostly thanks to Senate confirmation hearings for the attorney general nominee, Michael Mukasey.
Mukasey calls it "repugnant ." Rudy Giuliani isn't sure what to call it. John McCain — who has something to compare it to — thinks it's torture. The Spanish Inquisition and the Khmer Rouge didn't call it anything — for them it was just day to day operations.

Kaj Larsen, a journalist for Current TV and a former Navy Seal, decided to give people a chance to decide for themselves... by having himself waterboarded on video, and making it available to anyone who wants to see what the debate is about. You can see it below — be warned, though, it's not much fun to watch. We'll talk to Kaj about his experience (believe it or not — this is the second time this guy has been waterboarded — he's a Navy SEAL), and why the technique inspires so much debate. If you want to see the video, you can see it here, at Current.com, but be warned, the images are disturbing.

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