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A Time-Shift to Celebrate

A Time-Shift to Celebrate

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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When Scott mentioned an idea he had about doing a segment on time-shifting holidays based on a conversation he had (and then, later, saw in the paper... must be flies on his walls!), I just laughed. My family invented this idea. Ok, that's not true, but seriously... we rarely celebrate a holiday on time. For example, take my sister's birthday and my birthday. Hers is in the spring, mine mid-summer... we toasted them both, together, in November. It's just so hard to assemble the necessary family members in one place at one time a dozen times a year, and we value the company more than the calendar. I'm not complaining, though — when we finally get around to them, our celebrations are always worth the wait. This flexibility comes in handy for Christmas, when my family, for the past two years, has time-shifted Christmas morning to Christmas evening so I can keep bringing the Talk to the nation. They're so cool we move it all — stockings, fancy breakfast and coffee, pajamas, and leisurely gift-opening — to 5 or 6pm when I get home. And even better... we get to drink BEER throughout (the sun's long over the yardarm by then). Do you time-shift your holidays? Does it make things better or worse?

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